Author Topic: New Build - New to Flat Figures  (Read 1285 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Hannibal

  • Uploader
  • *
  • Country: be
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2021, 04:20:53 AM »
Very good start, Mark, with the hat, in giving light and shadows, and therefore volume, tri-dimensional effect.  Also the white lining at the top edge of the hat, where light usually makes a spot and gives shape to a dark surface.


1. Don't be shy to increase your light more (exagerate a bit), you can always revert after, to make it visible enough = a black suit can be painted dark grey, not black, to be able to paint shadows black and highlights amost white = see shiny boots for example on paintings of great masters.
2. Don't nécéssairily put your light source in the plan of the flat, sideways on the left of the character, but more upfront, to avoid having to paint a character half lightened on the right and half black on the right, and edges only on the right side.  By bringing your light source in your right back (niot totally in your back = flash effect), the lightening on the hat will not be at the edge, but 1/3 to the right, then against darker at the edge. On this way you will also give light lightening to the left side of the hat, flat surface, therefor volume !


3. Use black for shadows, and grey, dark grey as basecolour, On this manner you can bring highlinghts and also shadows and shape your painting in volume.  It gives you more freedom in painting volume....


Cheers ...
Michel
_______
Men are a bit like God: everything they can do, they do it. Or they will do it.  (Jean d'Ormesson)

Mark Cunnington

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: gb
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2021, 03:57:51 PM »
After quite a break (work got very busy) I made a start on the hat. Instead of painting a base colour and laying on the shade/highlights I tried three mixes to lay next to each other and blend. It was harder work and it got a bit mixed up but I see that is a good technique. I'm beginning to get more confident in being less subtle in highlights.
I also soaked away the oil on cardboard and used liquin for the first time. I thought I was experienced in using oils but this made a massive difference. I'm looking forward to the next stage (hat lace and the face) although I think my next sets of days off are about to be cancelled. Damn.

PJDeluhery

  • Global Moderator
  • Uploader
  • ****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2021, 03:03:06 PM »
Yes, the red is looking good! Keep it up.   8)
BFFS Member,
N. American Rep.
If the world is wrong; then right your own self...Brother Dave Gardner

shogun

  • Associate
  • Uploader
  • **
  • Country: de
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2021, 06:21:09 AM »
The "Red" looks great!
Greetings from Saxony
Ralf

Mark Cunnington

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: gb
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2021, 05:16:36 AM »
Thank you for that guys. I had a long week of duty so the figure had dried before I added a further set of shadows and highlights and I like the effect. The picture may not do it justice and I may tinker with a further set...

PJDeluhery

  • Global Moderator
  • Uploader
  • ****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2021, 01:06:29 PM »
Your shadows and highlights may require a second or even third coat to get them to the right values. Especially for Alizarin Crimson which is semi transparent.
BFFS Member,
N. American Rep.
If the world is wrong; then right your own self...Brother Dave Gardner

marko

  • Administrator
  • Uploader
  • *****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2021, 01:36:19 PM »
Very nice start on this with a color that is difficult at the best of times - reds. 


As a member you might also look in the knowledgeable section and an article by Daniel Canet called Painting in Vivid Colors.  He has some examples of the type of thinking and approach I think you are going for on this and has an approach that would deal with your colors running into each other, e.g. like you i paint wet-on-wet and sometimes have this issues well.  Daniel blocks in everything side-by-side which works around this and helps make his colors pop.  As you are doing a large scale figure this may work for you.


mark  8)
« Last Edit: April 06, 2021, 02:16:31 PM by marko »
Site Admin

Mark Cunnington

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: gb
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2021, 01:24:36 PM »
It's been a while due to work and then half term holidays but I managed to paint the red coat this weekend. I know I should have started on the face but I liked the reds so much I just had to paint them.
I decided the light source would be upper right (as you are viewing the figure) so he is looking towards the light. I used Cadmium red medium with shadows in Alizarin Crimson and highlights in Cadmium red light. I thinned the base coat down for the first time ever using oils and it initially went on well followed by removal of excess with a soft brush. However, I think I used too much thinner for the shadows etc. as they ran into each other. Should I have let the base dry first?
I then used un-thinned paint for the shadows/highlights and it worked a little better. I am definitely too subtle in highlighting still. That's down to painting too many round figures over the years. Live and learn.




PJDeluhery

  • Global Moderator
  • Uploader
  • ****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2021, 11:39:02 PM »
Thinning will still allow you to slowly blend.

If anything, thinning may speed drying, though I'll defer to Ed on that one because I dry my figures in a crock pot overnight. 

I too learn something from every figure I paint. It's one of the joys of painting for me. Never gets old.
BFFS Member,
N. American Rep.
If the world is wrong; then right your own self...Brother Dave Gardner

Ed Humphreys

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: wales
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2021, 08:34:14 AM »
I have always used W &N's Liquin as a medium. Take the oil paint down to a thin constituency, almost like milk. It will usually be touch dry and ready for another wash, if necessary, in 24 hours. It is very useful for glazing, giving subtle nuances of colour to a base coat.
Experiment and have fun.
Ed H

Mark Cunnington

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: gb
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2021, 06:38:15 AM »
In reply to your question, Mark, oils can be thinned quite a bit using either a medium, mineral spirits or turpentine. I usually thin oils to about the consistency of skimmed milk. Sometimes it takes two or three coats to get the desired coverage, but you have better control and more pleasing results. Nothing worse than a thick coat of paint on a figure. FWIW, this was the hardest thing for me to learn as an oils painter. I know there is a technique in which you put the oil on without thinning it (straight from the tube) and then brush off the excess. If you're used to working that way, I guess it's worth a try. I could never make it work. The good news is that if your paint is too thin, you can always put on another coat. If its too thick, - not much you can do. So don't be afraid of thinning it out.

Welcome to the forum and good luck in your painting.




Thank you,
Thinning oils is really new to me then as I used them from the tube previously. Does thinning allow for slow blending still? Do oils still take ages to dry whilst thinned.
I first started using oils 30 years ago and I'm pleased to be still learning!


Mark

marko

  • Administrator
  • Uploader
  • *****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2021, 03:12:17 PM »
Also here is a semi-famous example by Peter Ferk way back in 2001 for the Chicago Show.  It was notable because as I recall the second version was done using only sepia paint.


[ Guests cannot view attachments ]
[ Guests cannot view attachments ]


mark  8)
Site Admin

marko

  • Administrator
  • Uploader
  • *****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2021, 02:19:40 PM »
Fellow Mark there is a nice collection articles in the Knowledgebase section of the Members only portion of the site relevant to oil/acrylic painting figures.  You also might wander through the SBS section of the site as well and there some good examples there as well.  (I am very partial to Daniel Canet's write up - Painting in Vidid Colors".


The other interesting difference you are dealing with is painting large flats - as you are - are also a bit more of a challenge to adapt to coming from larger rounds.  However, the larger flats are the most popular now as well and as such you have many more example articles to choose from so there is a plus.


My best painting advice is to chose a well engraved figure to start with as that seems to get everything off on the correct basis.  Have fun and good luck!  (It looks like you are doing a Quadri Concept figure which qualifies nicely as a well designed and engraved.)


mark  8)
Site Admin

PJDeluhery

  • Global Moderator
  • Uploader
  • ****
  • Country: us
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2021, 01:07:10 PM »
In reply to your question, Mark, oils can be thinned quite a bit using either a medium, mineral spirits or turpentine. I usually thin oils to about the consistency of skimmed milk. Sometimes it takes two or three coats to get the desired coverage, but you have better control and more pleasing results. Nothing worse than a thick coat of paint on a figure. FWIW, this was the hardest thing for me to learn as an oils painter. I know there is a technique in which you put the oil on without thinning it (straight from the tube) and then brush off the excess. If you're used to working that way, I guess it's worth a try. I could never make it work. The good news is that if your paint is too thin, you can always put on another coat. If its too thick, - not much you can do. So don't be afraid of thinning it out.

Welcome to the forum and good luck in your painting.
BFFS Member,
N. American Rep.
If the world is wrong; then right your own self...Brother Dave Gardner

Ed Humphreys

  • Member
  • Uploader
  • ***
  • Country: wales
Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2021, 01:32:06 PM »
Welcome, Mark.
As a general principal, paint stronger shadows and highlights than you think is necessary. Most reformed (converted?) painters of solid figures tend to be too timid. You need to exaggerate to bring out the full depth.
Ed H

 

Powered by EzPortal