Author Topic: New Build - New to Flat Figures  (Read 1825 times)

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marko

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Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2021, 03:12:17 PM »
Also here is a semi-famous example by Peter Ferk way back in 2001 for the Chicago Show.  It was notable because as I recall the second version was done using only sepia paint.


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mark  8)
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marko

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Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2021, 02:19:40 PM »
Fellow Mark there is a nice collection articles in the Knowledgebase section of the Members only portion of the site relevant to oil/acrylic painting figures.  You also might wander through the SBS section of the site as well and there some good examples there as well.  (I am very partial to Daniel Canet's write up - Painting in Vidid Colors".


The other interesting difference you are dealing with is painting large flats - as you are - are also a bit more of a challenge to adapt to coming from larger rounds.  However, the larger flats are the most popular now as well and as such you have many more example articles to choose from so there is a plus.


My best painting advice is to chose a well engraved figure to start with as that seems to get everything off on the correct basis.  Have fun and good luck!  (It looks like you are doing a Quadri Concept figure which qualifies nicely as a well designed and engraved.)


mark  8)
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PJDeluhery

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Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2021, 01:07:10 PM »
In reply to your question, Mark, oils can be thinned quite a bit using either a medium, mineral spirits or turpentine. I usually thin oils to about the consistency of skimmed milk. Sometimes it takes two or three coats to get the desired coverage, but you have better control and more pleasing results. Nothing worse than a thick coat of paint on a figure. FWIW, this was the hardest thing for me to learn as an oils painter. I know there is a technique in which you put the oil on without thinning it (straight from the tube) and then brush off the excess. If you're used to working that way, I guess it's worth a try. I could never make it work. The good news is that if your paint is too thin, you can always put on another coat. If its too thick, - not much you can do. So don't be afraid of thinning it out.

Welcome to the forum and good luck in your painting.
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Ed Humphreys

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Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2021, 01:32:06 PM »
Welcome, Mark.
As a general principal, paint stronger shadows and highlights than you think is necessary. Most reformed (converted?) painters of solid figures tend to be too timid. You need to exaggerate to bring out the full depth.
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Hannibal

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Re: New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2021, 06:44:37 AM »
Dear Mark,


The best advices I could give you besides the Bible of Flat painting of Mike Taylor, is to read the outstanding step-by-step painting of Hina and Tinirau that Nick described in three BFFS magazines last two years, 132, 133, 137 and 137.


You can present also your painting progresses here and receive advices from us all on a constructive way. This is how I improved my painting too through Forum help and advices, and shows and verbal advices from good painters in from of my works and mistakes.....  No shame, just helps to climb step by step this motivating ladder with the will: "each new painting will be better than the previous one and what I learned from them".


M.
Michel
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Men are a bit like God: everything they can do, they do it. Or they will do it.  (Jean d'Ormesson)

Mark Cunnington

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New Build - New to Flat Figures
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2021, 02:14:14 AM »
All,
Hannibal very kindly sent me some figures and I’d like to learn from you via this forum. I’m starting on a trumpeter from the Gendarmerie d’Elite as his uniform is relatively simple with large areas of cloth. I’m not ready for a hussar yet!
I’ve primed and under-painted him with acrylics (foundry, Vallejo and games workshop). I intend to use oils mainly but will use acrylics for small details (epaulettes etc.). I’m yet to get used to shading and highlighting with acrylics.
I’ve used oils for round figures in the past but I think light and shadow has to be more accentuated for flats?
On reading the Art of the Flat Tin Figure I see that oils can be thinned very slightly. I’ve never thinned oils before. Does it work?


This may take a while as I work for the emergency services and don’t get much time off at the moment. Any help and advice is appreciated.


Stay safe


Mark

 

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